Rhinichthys osculus oligoporus

Taxonomy 
Scientific Name:Rhinichthys osculus oligoporus
Common name:Clover Valley speckled dace
Rank and Status   
Global Rank:G5T1 Native Status:Native
Subnational (State) Rank:S1 Endemic:Yes
US ESA Status:Listed endangered Sand Dunes:No
NNHP Tracking Status:At-Risk List Wetland:Yes
Other Agency Status Status Last Updated Status Comments
Bureau of Land Management - Nevada Sensitive BLM Nevada Sensitive Species List dated 2017-10-01
State of Nevada Protected Endangered Fish NAC 503.065.2
Nevada Wildlife Action Plan - 2012 Species of Conservation Priority
Nevada Wildlife Action Plan - 2005 Species of Conservation Priority
CCVI Score Highly Vulnerable Conf. VH; Factors contributing to increased vulnerability are natural barriers and historical and physiological hydrological niche.
Distribution (NV Counties)

Status: Confident or certain

Elko
Summary Occurrence Data
Occurrence Count:4
Total Observed Area (hectares):Not Available
Maximum Known Elevation (m):Not available
Minimum Known Elevation (m):1762
Links
Rhinichthys osculus oligoporus data at NatureServe
Rhinichthys osculus oligoporus photos and data at Encyclopedia of Life
Character Abstract
Identification Comments:
Subspecies Comments:
Food Habits:
Phenology Comments:
Reproduction Comments:Generally, speckled dace mature in their second summer. They are capable of spawning throughout the summer, but peak activity usually occurs in the months of June and July at water temperatures of 18° C (65° F) (USFWS 1998a).
Migration Mobility:
Habitat Comments:Clover Valley speckled dace are found primarily in reservoirs and outflows of the three spring systems: Clover Valley Warm Springs, Wright Ranch Spring, and Bradish Spring. There do not appear to be any associated marshes with these springs, only the outflows that have been heavily modified.
Ecology comments:The speckled dace is one of the most morphologically (and ecologically) variable fishes in western North America (Miller and Miller 1948, Minckley 1973). This variability is due to geologic events that have resulted in numerous isolated populations. Details of Clover Valley speckled dace seasonal habitat requirements, population size, distribution over time, reproductive potential, and available habitat are unknown because access to the properties to conduct studies was not permitted in the past. Generally, speckled dace are characterized as diurnal (active during the daytime), bottom browsers that feed primarily on small invertebrates (such as aquatic insects), plant material, and zooplankton (floating, microscopic aquatic animals). Specific reproductive patterns of the Clover Valley speckled dace have not been examined. Generally, speckled dace mature in their second summer. They are capable of spawning throughout the summer, but peak activity usually occurs in the months of June and July at water temperatures of 18° C (65° F) (USFWS 1998a).
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