Lepidomeda mollispinis mollispinis

Taxonomy 
Scientific Name:Lepidomeda mollispinis mollispinis
Common name:Virgin River spinedace
Rank and Status   
Global Rank:G2T2 Native Status:Native
Subnational (State) Rank:S1 Endemic:No
US ESA Status:None Sand Dunes:No
NNHP Tracking Status:At-Risk List Wetland:Yes
Other Agency Status Status Last Updated Status Comments
Bureau of Land Management - Nevada Dropped, no longer of concern Not included in 2011 BLM Sensitive list
State of Nevada Protected Protected Fish NAC 503.065.1
Nevada Wildlife Action Plan - 2012 Species of Conservation Priority
Nevada Wildlife Action Plan - 2005 Species of Conservation Priority
CCVI Score Presumed Stable Conf. VH.
Distribution (NV Counties)

Status: Confident or certain

Clark Lincoln
Summary Occurrence Data
Occurrence Count:4
Total Observed Area (hectares):Not Available
Maximum Known Elevation (m):475
Minimum Known Elevation (m):458
Links
Lepidomeda mollispinis mollispinis data at NatureServe
Lepidomeda mollispinis mollispinis photos and data at Encyclopedia of Life
Character Abstract
Identification Comments:
Subspecies Comments:
Food Habits:The Virgin River spinedace is an opportunistic feeder. It feeds seasonally on aquatic and terrestrial insects, insect larvae, and floating plant material. It feeds at or near the surface of the water (Minckley 1973), but reportedly also feeds on the bottom. In Beaver Dam Wash, Utah, they are primarily insectivorous in late winter. Important foods include stratiomyid and hydropsyche larvae, and adult ephemeropterans and trichopterans (Angradi et al. 1991).
Phenology Comments:
Reproduction Comments:Spawns usually over gravel and sand substrates at the lower ends of pools on or near the bottom (Minckley 1973). Spawns April-June. Reaches maturity after one year. One- and two-year-old females spawn once/season. Three-year-old females may spawn twice in a season (Lee et al. 1980).
Migration Mobility:
Habitat Comments:This species is most often found in rocky riffles, runs, and pools associated with headwaters (springs), creeks, and small rivers. It prefers water temperatures from 9-11°C (48-52°F). The Virgin River spinedace is usually found in shaded pools (0.5-2.0 m (1.6-6.6 ft) deep), but can also be found in runs (e.g., at Beaver Dam Wash) and in shear zones between high and low velocities with cover such as boulders, undercut banks, or vegetation. Occasionally is found in riffles in winter (Angradi et al. 1991).
Ecology comments:The Virgin River spinedace usually spawns over gravel and sand substrates at the lower ends of pools on or near the bottom (Minckley 1973). It spawns April-June and reaches maturity after one year. One- and two-year-old females spawn once/season. Three-year-old females may spawn twice in a season (Lee et al. 1980).
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