Gila robusta jordani

Taxonomy 
Scientific Name:Gila robusta jordani
Common name:Pahranagat roundtail chub
Rank and Status   
Global Rank:G3T1 Native Status:Native
Subnational (State) Rank:S1 Endemic:Yes
US ESA Status:Listed endangered Sand Dunes:No
NNHP Tracking Status:At-Risk List Wetland:Yes
Other Agency Status Status Last Updated Status Comments
Bureau of Land Management - Nevada Sensitive BLM Nevada Sensitive Species List dated 2017-10-01
State of Nevada Protected Endangered Fish NAC 503.065.2
Nevada Wildlife Action Plan - 2012 Species of Conservation Priority
Nevada Wildlife Action Plan - 2005 Species of Conservation Priority
CCVI Score Presumed Stable Conf. VH.
Distribution (NV Counties)

Status: Confident or certain

Lincoln
Summary Occurrence Data
Occurrence Count:5
Total Observed Area (hectares):Not Available
Maximum Known Elevation (m):Not available
Minimum Known Elevation (m):1100
Links
Gila robusta jordani data at NatureServe
Gila robusta jordani photos and data at Encyclopedia of Life
Character Abstract
Identification Comments:
Subspecies Comments:
Food Habits:Pahranagat roundtail chub primarily eat drifting invertebrates, but also occasionally consume food off the bottom. They eat some plant material and rarely eat other fish.
Phenology Comments:
Reproduction Comments:Spawning typically occurs in late January and peaks in early to mid-February. Water temperatures during this period range from 17-24°C (63-76°F). Areas up to 3 feet deep with gravel substrate and relatively swift flows are used. Each spawning female may be attended by a group of 2-10 males. Spawning occurs intermittently over several days. The eggs are broadcast and drop into spaces between the rocks. Larvae swim-up in approximately 28 days. They likely live from 3-5 years.
Migration Mobility:
Habitat Comments:Current known distribution of the Pahranagat roundtail chub in the wild is limited to an approximately 3/4-mile reach of the Pahranagat River (Ditch) below the Ash Springs outflow on private property. It has not been observed in either Crystal or Hiko springs since the early 1950s, and suitable lotic habitats at both those locations have been severely reduced or eliminated. Presumed distribution within the Pahranagat River (Ditch) is reduced from that found historically because much of the former river channel has been lined with concrete to facilitate irrigation, or lost as a result of agricultural development. It is thought to seek thermal refuge closer to the thermophilic outflows during winter, but spawns in the cooler portions of the outflows in late spring. They are omnivores, feeding mostly on aquatic insects with larger adult occasionally feeding on smaller fishes and other aquatic vertebrates.
Ecology comments:Spawning typically occurs in late January and peaks in early to mid-February. Water temperatures during this period range from 17-24°C (63-76°F). Areas up to 3 feet deep with gravel substrate and relatively swift flows are used. Each spawning female may be attended by a group of 2-10 males. Spawning occurs intermittently over several days. The eggs are broadcast and drop into spaces between the rocks. Larvae swim-up in approximately 28 days. They likely live from 3-5 years.
Version Date:
Images:

Not Available