Eremichthys acros

Taxonomy 
Scientific Name:Eremichthys acros
Common name:Desert Dace
Rank and Status   
Global Rank:G1 Native Status:Native
Subnational (State) Rank:S1 Endemic:Yes
US ESA Status:Listed threatened Sand Dunes:No
NNHP Tracking Status:At-Risk List Wetland:Yes
Other Agency Status Status Last Updated Status Comments
Bureau of Land Management - Nevada Sensitive BLM Nevada Sensitive Species List dated 2017-10-01
State of Nevada Protected Threatened Fish NAC 503.065.3
Nevada Wildlife Action Plan - 2012 Species of Conservation Priority
Nevada Wildlife Action Plan - 2005 Species of Conservation Priority
CCVI Score Moderately Vulnerable Conf. VH; Factors contributing to increased vulnerability are natural and anthropogenic barriers and historical and physiological hydrological niche.
Distribution (NV Counties)

Status: Confident or certain

Humboldt
Summary Occurrence Data
Occurrence Count:8
Total Observed Area (hectares):Not Available
Maximum Known Elevation (m):Not available
Minimum Known Elevation (m):1320
Links
Eremichthys acros data at NatureServe
Eremichthys acros photos and data at Encyclopedia of Life
Character Abstract
Identification Comments:
Subspecies Comments:
Food Habits:Desert dace are omnivorous, but eat mainly periphyton,filamentous algae, zooplankton, snails, and aquatic insect larvae, however, Nyquist (1963) reported that in aquaria, large desert dace preyed upon smaller fishes.
Phenology Comments:
Reproduction Comments:Desert dace have been observed spawning in temperatures from 70 to 86 F ( 21-30 C) documented breeding has been observed in March, May, and November (Nyquist 1963). Duration of egg incubation is likely relatively of short duration (2 weeks or less) because of high water temperatures (USFWS 1997).  
Migration Mobility:
Habitat Comments:Desert dace occupy habitat in 10 thermal spring areas (two of which were introduced populations) and their outflow consisting of 3.1 miles total, in areas with temperatures of 18-40° C (64-104° F). They are most common in temperatures of 18-40.5° C (64 - 104° F), from spring pools and outflows. Desert dace  have the highest temperature tolerance of any minnow in North America (Nyquist 1963). From recent survey work, desert dace occupy a variety of habitats in Soldier Meadow including; spring pools and  outflows; artificial impoundments, earthen ditches and alkali marshes. Water temperature is a determining factor in desert dace distribution as it is a thermal obligate.
Ecology comments:Desert dace have been observed spawning in temperatures from 70 to 86 F ( 21-30 C) documented breeding has been observed in March, May, and November (Nyquist 1963). Duration of egg incubation is likely relatively of short duration (2 weeks or less) because of high water temperatures (USFWS 1997) Larval and juvenile desert dace inhabit shallow, shoreline areas of outflow streams, larval dace have been observed in emergent vegetation in still shallow water (USFWS 1997).             
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