Plagopterus argentissimus

Taxonomy 
Scientific Name:Plagopterus argentissimus
Common name:woundfin
Rank and Status   
Global Rank:G1 Native Status:Native
Subnational (State) Rank:S1 Endemic:No
US ESA Status:Listed endangered, nonessential experimental population Sand Dunes:No
NNHP Tracking Status:At-Risk List Wetland:Yes
Other Agency Status Status Last Updated Status Comments
Bureau of Land Management - Nevada Sensitive BLM Nevada Sensitive Species List dated 2017-10-01
State of Nevada Protected Endangered Fish NAC 503.065.2
Nevada Wildlife Action Plan - 2012 Species of Conservation Priority
Nevada Wildlife Action Plan - 2005 Species of Conservation Priority
CCVI Score Presumed Stable Conf. VH.
Distribution (NV Counties)

Status: Confident or certain

Clark
Summary Occurrence Data
Occurrence Count:3
Total Observed Area (hectares):Not Available
Maximum Known Elevation (m):480
Minimum Known Elevation (m):372
Links
Plagopterus argentissimus data at NatureServe
Plagopterus argentissimus photos and data at Encyclopedia of Life
Character Abstract
Identification Comments:
Subspecies Comments:
Food Habits:The woundfin apparently feeds on aquatic insects, detritus and algae. Near Mesquite, Nevada, it feeds primarily on ceratopogonid larvae in February, mayflies in June, chironomids and ceratopogonids in December. Near Beaver Dam Wash, it feeds primarily on chironomid larvae and organic debris in February, Tamarix seeds, simuliid larvae, organic debris, and mayflies in June, chironomid larvae, organic debris, and spirogyra in September, and ceratopongonids, simuliid pupae, chironomid larvae, and organic debris in December (Greger and Deacon 1988).
Phenology Comments:
Reproduction Comments:Reproductive cycle probably is triggered by increasing temperature and declining spring runoff in late May (Matthews and Moseley 1990). In captivity, most spawn the second spring after hatching; most survive two reproductive seasons (Minckley and Deacon 1991).
Migration Mobility:
Habitat Comments:The woundfin occupies main channels of seasonally swift, highly turbid, extremely warm, small to medium rivers, with sandy, constantly shifting bottoms (Lee et al. 1980, Page and Burr 1991). It prefers runs and quiet waters adjacent to shallow riffles (Matthews and Moseley 1990). Larvae utilize shallow areas lateral to the main current. Young usually are in quiet sections or isolated pools in clear water where algae is present (USFWS 1995b). The woundfin spawns in swifter flowing water over beds of cobble or gravel. Females return to pools after spawning (Matthews and Moseley 1990).
Ecology comments:The life span of the woundfin is apparently seldom, if ever, more than 4 years. Its reproductive cycle probably is triggered by increasing temperature and declining spring runoff in late May (Matthews and Moseley 1990). In captivity, most spawn the second spring after hatching and most survive two reproductive seasons (Minckley and Deacon 1991).
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