Cyprinodon nevadensis mionectes

Taxonomy 
Scientific Name:Cyprinodon nevadensis mionectes
Common name:Ash Meadows Amargosa pupfish
Family:Cyprinodontidae Minor Group:Fish Major Group:Vertebrate Animal
Rank and Status     
Global Rank:G2T2 Endemic:Yes NNHP Track Status:At-Risk List
Subnational (State) Rank:S2 Sand Dunes:No USESA Status:LE: Listed endangered
Native Status:Native Wetland:Yes
Other Agency Status Status Last Updated Status Comments
Bureau of Land Management - Nevada Sensitive BLM 2011 list
State of Nevada Protected Threatened Fish NAC 503.065.3
Nevada Wildlife Action Plan - 2012 Species of Conservation Priority
Nevada Wildlife Action Plan - 2005 Species of Conservation Priority
CCVI Score Presumed Stable Conf. VH.
Distribution (NV Counties)

Status: Confident or certain

Nye
Summary Occurrence Data
Occurrence Count:17
Total Observed Area (hectares):Not Available
Maximum Known Elevation (m):Not available
Minimum Known Elevation (m):646
Links
Cyprinodon nevadensis mionectes data at NatureServe
Cyprinodon nevadensis mionectes photos and data at Encyclopedia of Life
Character Abstract
Identification Comments:
Subspecies Comments:
Food Habits:
Phenology Comments:
Reproduction Comments:In warm springs may reach sexual maturity in 4-6 weeks. Reproduction variable: in springs, pupfish breed throughout the year, may have 8-10 generations/year; in streams, breeds in spring and summer, 2-3 generations/year (Moyle 1976). In springs, males establish territories over sites suitable for oviposition. Short generation time allows small populations to be viable. Young adults typically comprise most of the biomass of a population.
Migration Mobility:
Habitat Comments:This species is isolated to warm springs and outflows in Ash Meadows NWR including Point of Rocks, Crystal Springs, and the Carson Slough drainage. Pupfishes feed generally on substrate; feeding territories are often defended by pupfishes. Diet consists of mainly algae and detritus however, aquatic insects, crustaceans, snails and eggs are also consumed. Spawning activity is typically from February to September and in some cases year round. Males defend territories vigorously during breeding season (Soltz and Naiman 1978).
Ecology comments:In warm springs, fish may reach sexual maturity in 4-6 weeks. Reproduction variable: in springs, pupfish breed throughout the year, may have 8-10 generations/year; in streams, breeds in spring and summer, 2-3 generations/year (Moyle 1976). In springs, males establish territories over sites suitable for oviposition. Short generation time allows small populations to be viable. Young adults typically comprise most of the biomass of a population. Compared to other C. nevadensis subspecies, this pupfish has a short deep body and long head with typically low fin ray and scale counts (Soltz and Naiman 1978).
Version Date:
Images:
individual in habitat
Photographer: Copyright Gary Monroe, Nevada Native Plant Society
Photo Date:
individual in habitat
Photographer: Copyright Gary Monroe, Nevada Native Plant Society
Photo Date: