Salvelinus confluentus pop. 4

Taxonomy 
Scientific Name:Salvelinus confluentus pop. 4
Common name:bull trout (Jarbidge River basin pop)
Rank and Status   
Global Rank:G4T2Q Native Status:Native
Subnational (State) Rank:S1 Endemic:No
US ESA Status:Listed threatened Sand Dunes:No
NNHP Tracking Status:At-Risk List Wetland:Yes
Other Agency Status Status Last Updated Status Comments
Bureau of Land Management - Nevada Sensitive BLM Nevada Sensitive Species List dated 2017-10-01
US Forest Service - Region 4 (Intermountain) Threatened USFS list, Jan 2015 update
State of Nevada Protected Game Fish NAC 503.060
Nevada Wildlife Action Plan - 2012 Species of Conservation Priority
Nevada Wildlife Action Plan - 2005 Species of Conservation Priority
American Fisheries Society Threatened
CCVI Score Highly Vulnerable Conf. Low; Factors contributing to increased vulnerability are natural barriers, physiological thermal niche, physiological hydrological niche, and disturbance.
Distribution (NV Counties)

Status: Confident or certain

Elko
Summary Occurrence Data
Occurrence Count:3
Total Observed Area (hectares):Not Available
Maximum Known Elevation (m):2323
Minimum Known Elevation (m):1792
Links
Salvelinus confluentus pop. 4 data at NatureServe
Salvelinus confluentus pop. 4 photos and data at Encyclopedia of Life
Character Abstract
Identification Comments:
Subspecies Comments:
Food Habits:Juveniles prey on predominately invertebrates, adults are piscivorous.
Phenology Comments:
Reproduction Comments:Usually spawns in gravel riffles of small tributary streams, including lake inlet streams. Spawning sites often are associated with springs (Rieman and McIntyre 1993). Young are closely associated with stream channel substrates (Rieman and McIntyre 1993). Areas with large woody debris and rubble substrate are important as juvenile rearing habitat (Spahr et al. 1991). Spawns in late summer or fall, with falling temperatures between 5-9° C (41-48° F). Eggs hatch in late winter or early spring. Fry emerge from gravel in April-May. Most information indicates that sexual maturity is attained in 5-7 years. Spawning populations may comprise 4 or more year classes, though 1-2 year classes may dominate. See Rieman and McIntyre (1993).
Migration Mobility:
Habitat Comments:Bull trout inhabit the bottom of deep pools in cold rivers and large tributary streams, often in moderate to fast currents with temperatures of 7-10° C (45-50° F), in addition to, large coldwater lakes and reservoirs. In the contiguous U.S., they are now extirpated in most large rivers that historically were inhabited, and confined mostly to headwater streams. Conditions that favor the persistence of populations include stable channel, relatively stable stream flow, low levels of fine substrate sediments, high stream channel complexity with various cover types, temperatures not exceeding about 15 C (59 F), and the presence of suitable corridors for movement between suitable winter and summer habitats and for genetic exchange among populations (Rieman and McIntyre 1993). Available information indicates that bull trout and other native fishes use different resources, reducing direct competition (Rieman and McIntyre 1993).
Ecology comments:Bull trout usually spawn in gravel riffles of small tributary streams, including lake inlet streams. Spawning sites often are associated with springs (Rieman and McIntyre 1993). Young are closely associated with stream channel substrates (Rieman and McIntyre 1993). Areas with large woody debris and rubble substrate are important as juvenile rearing habitat (Spahr et al. 1991). Bull trout spawn in late summer or fall, with falling temperatures between 5-9° C (41-48° F). Eggs hatch in late winter or early spring. Fry emerge from gravel in April-May. Most information indicates that sexual maturity is attained in 5-7 years. Spawning populations may comprise 4 or more year classes, though 1-2 year classes may dominate. See Rieman and McIntyre (1993).
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Images:

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