Spizella atrogularis

Taxonomy 
Scientific Name:Spizella atrogularis
Common name:Black-chinned Sparrow
Rank and Status   
Global Rank:G5 Native Status:Native
Subnational (State) Rank:S2B Endemic:No
US ESA Status:None Sand Dunes:No
NNHP Tracking Status:At-Risk List Wetland:No
Other Agency Status Status Last Updated Status Comments
Nevada Wildlife Action Plan - 2012 Species of Conservation Priority
Nevada Wildlife Action Plan - 2005 Species of Conservation Priority
Nevada Partners in Flight Priority Bird Species
Audubon Watchlist 2007 Red List
CCVI Score Presumed Stable Conf. VH.
Distribution (NV Counties)

Status: Predicted or probable

Clark Lincoln
Summary Occurrence Data
Occurrence Count:6
Total Observed Area (hectares):Not Available
Maximum Known Elevation (m):1939
Minimum Known Elevation (m):1280
Links
Spizella atrogularis data at NatureServe
Spizella atrogularis photos and data at Encyclopedia of Life
Character Abstract
Identification Comments:
Subspecies Comments:
Food Habits:Feeds on insects and small seeds. Forages in brush and on ground. Flies under and over brush in search of food.
Phenology Comments:
Reproduction Comments:
Migration Mobility:
Habitat Comments:Breeds in chaparral, sagebrush, and arid scrub; on gentle hillsides to steep, rocky slopes, or in brushy canyons; sea level to nearly 2,700 m (8,860ft) (AOU 1998, Rising 1996, Tenney 1997). In montane chaparral, associated with chamise, ceanothus, and scrub oak-dominated habitats. Nests in loose local colonies (Rising 1996, Terres 1980).
Ecology comments:Generally moves downslope after breeding or south into desert grassland scrub, where grass and forb seeds are an important winter food source (Tenney, pers. comm.). May forage beneath shrub canopy or in adjacent grassy areas (Tenney 1997). Based on the TNC (2011) model, Black-chinned Sparrows in Nevada may be affected by the decline in late-successional, higher-elevation (mesic) blackbrush, which is partially offset by minor gains in other cover types, resulting in a projected population decrease of 19% in 50 years.
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