Haliaeetus leucocephalus

Taxonomy 
Scientific Name:Haliaeetus leucocephalus
Common name:Bald Eagle
Rank and Status   
Global Rank:G5 Native Status:Native
Subnational (State) Rank:S2B,S4N Endemic:No
US ESA Status:None Sand Dunes:No
NNHP Tracking Status:At-Risk List Wetland:Yes
Other Agency Status Status Last Updated Status Comments
Bureau of Land Management - Nevada Sensitive BLM Nevada Sensitive Species List dated 2017-10-01
US Forest Service - Region 4 (Intermountain) Sensitive USFS list, Jan 2015 update
US Forest Service - Region 5 (California) Sensitive USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Region [R5], Sensitive Animal Species by Forest, updated 09/09/2013
US Forest Service - Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit Sensitive USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Region [R5], Sensitive Animal Species by Forest, updated 09/09/2013
State of Nevada Protected Endangered Birds NAC 503.050.2
Nevada Wildlife Action Plan - 2012 Species of Conservation Priority
Nevada Wildlife Action Plan - 2005 Species of Conservation Priority
Nevada Partners in Flight Priority Bird Species
CCVI Score Presumed Stable Conf. VH.
Distribution (NV Counties)

Status: Confident or certain

Churchill Elko Mineral Washoe
Douglas Lyon
Summary Occurrence Data
Occurrence Count:6
Total Observed Area (hectares):Not Available
Maximum Known Elevation (m):1951
Minimum Known Elevation (m):1270
Links
Haliaeetus leucocephalus data at NatureServe
Haliaeetus leucocephalus photos and data at Encyclopedia of Life
Character Abstract
Identification Comments:
Subspecies Comments:
Food Habits:Feeds opportunistically on fishes, injured waterfowl, various mammals, and carrion (Terres 1980). Hunts live prey, scavenges, and pirates food from other birds.
Phenology Comments:
Reproduction Comments:Clutch size is 1-3 (usually 2). Incubation lasts about 5 weeks, by both sexes. Second hatched young often dies. Young first fly at 10-12.5 weeks, cared for by adults and may remain around nest for several weeks after fledging. Generally first breeds at about 5-6 years. Adults may not lay every year.
Migration Mobility:Primarily found in Nevada during the winter months, November through March; small Spring-Summer breeding population.
Habitat Comments:Usually nests in tall trees or on cliffs near bodies of water that provide a food base. Nest trees include pines, spruce, firs, and cottonwoods. Nests located on cliffs and rock pinnacles have been reported historically in NV. The same nest may be used year after year, or may alternate between two nest sites in successive years. In NV, preferentially roosts in thick cottonwood groves, but sometimes in conifers or other sheltered sites in some areas; communal roost sites in Nevada have harbored as many as 65 birds in a night and are preferred for their warmer microclimates. Winter distribution is influenced by waterfowl concentrations or wetland sites with abundant dead fish (Griffin et al. 1982). Recent increase in winter numbers in Carson Valley associated with calving; eagles eat the nutrient rich placenta.
Ecology comments:Often roosts communally, especially in winter. Winter home ranges can be very large, especially for non-breeding birds. In NV, preferentially roosts in thick cottonwood groves, but sometimes in conifers or other sheltered sites in some areas; communal roost sites in Nevada have harbored as many as 65 birds in a night and are preferred for their warmer microclimates.
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