Empidonax traillii adastus

Taxonomy 
Scientific Name:Empidonax traillii adastus
Common name:Great Basin Willow Flycatcher
Rank and Status   
Global Rank:G5T5 Native Status:Native
Subnational (State) Rank:S1S2B Endemic:No
US ESA Status:None Sand Dunes:No
NNHP Tracking Status:At-Risk List Wetland:Yes
Other Agency Status Status Last Updated Status Comments
Bureau of Land Management - Nevada Sensitive BLM Nevada Sensitive Species List dated 2017-10-01
US Forest Service - Region 5 (California) Sensitive USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Region [R5], Sensitive Animal Species by Forest, updated 09/09/2013
US Forest Service - Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit Sensitive USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Region [R5], Sensitive Animal Species by Forest, updated 09/09/2013
Nevada Wildlife Action Plan - 2012 Species of Conservation Priority 2012 WAP lists full species
Nevada Wildlife Action Plan - 2005 Species of Conservation Priority
Nevada Partners in Flight Priority Bird Species
CCVI Score Presumed Stable Conf. VH.
Distribution (NV Counties)

Status: Predicted or probable

El Dorado
Summary Occurrence Data
Occurrence Count:2
Total Observed Area (hectares):Not Available
Maximum Known Elevation (m):Not available
Minimum Known Elevation (m):1902
Links
Empidonax traillii adastus data at NatureServe
Empidonax traillii adastus photos and data at Encyclopedia of Life
Character Abstract
Identification Comments:
Subspecies Comments:
Food Habits:Eats mainly insects caught in flight, sometimes gleans insects from foliage; occasionally eats berries. In breeding range, forages within and occasionally above dense riparian vegetation.
Phenology Comments:
Reproduction Comments:
Migration Mobility:
Habitat Comments:In central, eastern, and northern Nevada the species is found in both lowland and montane riparian habitats, and occasionally in other inundated areas such as aspen stands or wet meadows (GBBO 2010). Uses the lower Colorado River corridor during migration (USFWS 2002c). Willows are the traditionally preferred vegetation (Sogge et al. 2010), but other shrub species are also used. Nests in fork or on horizontal limb of small tree, shrub, or vine, at height of 0.6-6.4 m (mean usually about 2-3 m) (Harris 1991), with dense vegetation above and around the nest.
Ecology comments:
Version Date:
Images:

Not Available